The Renters (Reform) Bill doesn’t need tweaking – it needs sinking

Property118 has published an opinion piece that reflects the concerns and frustrations of some landlords regarding the proposed Renters (Reform) Bill and its potential impact on the private rented sector (PRS). It can be seen here, and the key points are:

Criticism of the Bill: Landlord...

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1 Comment

  1. Brandon Taylor

    At a time when the Government needs to be encouraging growth in the PRS to help tackle the national housing shortage, this bill should be scrapped immediately. If this bill does come into force and Section 21 possessions become a thing of the past, then the PRS will be moved back into the dark ages (pre 15 January 1989/ 1988 Rent Act). It was a business minded Conservative Government who brought in the 1988 Rent Act which ended years of suppression of the PRS. Although it took several years to gain momentum, this was the start of the rise of the PRS which has housed millions of happy tenants over the last 34 years. For a Conservative Government to U-Turn on its own well thought out policies just to appease some left-winged lobby groups is simply beyond belief. The threat of this single policy coupled with the Section 24 tax rules has already caused misery for thousands of landlords and tenants with good landlords having to sell their buildings and evict long term tenants just to stay in business. In the long run, if Section 21 goes it will cause long term misery for hundreds of thousands would be tenants who will never find a good home in a shrinking PRS. Michael Gove and his band of advisers need to acknowledge this and re-think their policies.

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